Tag Archives: bureaucracy

Brexit Reaction

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised by the comically unhinged reaction to #Brexit by the progressive left on both sides of the Atlantic.

Perhaps the anxiety is rooted in a fear of seeing their worldview successfully challenged. Despite most Americans having no idea how the EU operates or why it is such an anti-democratic sham that Europeans across party lines loathe, progressive leftists are hell bent on making sure their audience know that Brexit was nothing more than a bunch of elderly white racists succumbing to “fear” and “hate.”

The EU immiserates its citizens via the euro and flagrantly rejected Irish, French and Dutch “no” votes to the Lisbon Treaty. It’s unelected commission has absolute authority to propose continent-wide legislation and regulation, while the EU Parliament serves as a mere rubber stamp to the Commission with up or down votes. An overwhelming number of Europeans don’t know or care who their MEPs (Member of European Parliament) are. The Eurocrats are fanatics with one aim: ever-closer union. That they never deny and in fact frequently boast of their zeal to politically integrate all of Europe no matter the costs should be an own-goal of sorts, a gaffe that undermines EU credibility. Instead, Eurocrats get away with it because our progressive internationalist media and elite fully agree with this aim, and therefore never challenge them or question the merits of unaccountable supranational technocracies.

Why? Because the left despises the self-governing nation state. Better to have a remote, unelected harem of experts and technocrats “nudging” and guiding the helpless masses through an international bureaucracy. It’s the same ethos that informs partisans of an ever-growing federal bureaucracy in America, a sea of acronyms and faceless agencies doing the real work of regulating and red-tape that Congress just can’t be depended on to do (because if they were, they’d be voted out for contemplating even a smidgen of the rule-making we get from the administrative state embedded within the Executive branch).

But, as George Will writes today, “the revival of nationhood is a prerequisite for the reinvigoration of self-government through reclaimed national sovereignty. Hence June 23, 2016, is now among the most important dates in postwar European history.”

Exactly. And that is why the left is so mad, and why all you hear about Brexit from lefties is the “false consciousness” that infected Leave voters in the form of hate, xenophobia and racism. The whole issue is democratic legitimacy and the question of who governs Britain: Parliament, as it had for centuries, or Brussels? Is this really such an abstract concern that it deserves to be ignored in the coverage? Because that is how progressive media is treating it, opting to focus – yet again – on divining the hearts of men and women they’ve never met and conclude that they are all foul, unenlightened racists.

George Will: “By breaking the leftward-clicking ratchet that moves steadily, and only, toward more “pooled” sovereignty and centralization of power, Brexit refutes the progressive narrative that history has an inexorable trajectory that “experts” discern and before which all must bow. The E.U.’s contribution to this fable is its vow to pursue “ever-closer union.””

The “arc of history” doesn’t exist.

Solid as Iraq

“When pride comes, then comes disgrace, but with humility comes wisdom.”
– Proverbs 11:2

In politics, disgrace does not follow pride and there are no such things as humility or wisdom. Partly this is because politics attracts the type of people who “think that it is not the system which we need fear, but the danger that it might be run by bad men,” as Friedrich Hayek wrote in The Road to Serfdom. The belief that there is nothing wrong with a bloated, oppressive, administrative bureaucracy actively engaged in managing the economy should be woefully outdated and subject to mockery. Alas, this idea retains decent heft in America and the broader West. Worse is the belief among federal bureaucrats that they are called to do important work on behalf of “society.” Worse still is they believe they are “public servants” arbitrating what’s fair and proper in civic life. But the absolute worst aspect of it all is how proud they are to play petty authoritarian. Whether it’s an IRS middle manager, an EPA busybody or an EEOC scold, American life is now regulated to the point of oppression by a class of elite social justice warriors who are all too happy for the opportunity. This is the subject of Charles Murray’s new bookBy the People, which calls for a form of conservative civil disobedience by way of noncompliance with the regulatory state. But the left is exceedingly proud of their regulatory state – they did build that, and over a long period and a “long march.” They are never going to part with it willingly or lightly; their identity depends on its preservation.

If only this was confined to the left. The reality though is that the faction of conservatives who base their identity more or less on American global power are similarly in thrall to pride. The spectacle that was Jeb Bush fumbling soft ball questions on the Iraq War last week was both instructive and foreboding. We got crystal clear confirmation that Jeb is surrounded by the same elite cadre of foreign policy hawks as was his brother George. We got warning that proponents of the war had undergone a level of soul-searching akin to that of Sauron after his first defeat. I would bet everything I own that without the advice of his team, Jeb would have answered Megyn Kelly’s “knowing what we know now” Iraq hypothetical with an unequivocal “no.” But Jeb is not without that advice, because that advice comes from a donor class and an establishment GOP mostly wedded to the idea that the Iraq War was basically the right call.

Hovering in the ether ever since the Democrats’ 2006 midterm romp is an obvious political truth, one which precious few on the right want to accept. The truth is this: the war in Iraq was devastating to conservatism and the Republican party. This devastation had layers. The first layer was the practical impact on the party, which suffered from both honest and dishonest partisan attacks by the Democrats and therefore limped into the post-Bush era discredited and with all the confidence and swagger of a beaten dog. The second layer has to do with how principled conservatism itself was discarded by the Bush administration. Despite pursuing a brave and fortuitous tax cut agenda, George W. Bush governed as a progressive Republican, aka a “compassionate conservative.” Federal spending skyrocketed, add-ons to entitlements were enthusiastically adopted and that once proud disciple of the Reagan-Laffer school of fiscal conservatism, Dick Cheney, opined that “deficits don’t matter.” That champions of the Bush legacy and adherents to the neoconservative worldview are one and the same today is not surprising. What is surprising is they lack any self-awareness or humility and instead prefer to look at their foreign policy record and bask in pride.

There was very little reason for conservatives to rally around Bush in 2004 beyond pride in the tribe. Compassionate conservatism was a disaster that ushered in Medicare D and No Child Left Behind. The “ownership society” Bush wished to cultivate was corrupted by the Fed and congressional loan edicts to mortgage lenders, setting the scene for the 2008 crash. The only reason Bush won in 2004 was because the war led Republican voters to dutifully vote to keep their tribe in power for fear of what the other would do. Now eleven years on, the other tribe is gearing up to rally around someone they don’t particularly like but to whom they owe loyalty and deference because again, pride and tribe, and again, those other bastards would be worse.

Because ultimately, depressingly, inevitably…. we’re all tribal animals and it will always be so, to a degree. What is the point though of living in a tribal democracy, where the mob reigns? Despite the fact that it is the natural condition of democracies to have competing tribes looking to get to 51% so that they may force their preferences and mandates on the other 49%, the American model is supposed to be something quite different. We are a republic because the founding generation looked askance at democracy. Pure, majoritarian democracy is indistinguishable from mob rule, whereas a republic would be healthier than a democracy because a combination of representative democracy with an ingrained respect for natural rights and common law would cement the centuries long social transition from “status to contract,” meaning a society where prospects and opportunities are contingent on an individual’s freedom to enter into contract instead of on social status or class. Democracy only works if certain first principles and inalienable rights are enshrined forever into the nation’s DNA so that no transient majority can ever deny those natural rights which inform the Declaration of Independence.

The parallel rise of the Tea Party along with a rowdy libertarian-minded youth are about far more than tribalism. They are about first principles and the attempt to revive them in the public conscience. The movements are essentially inchoate, schizophrenic attempts by frustrated conservatives and libertarians to reclaim the agenda from the big spending, saber-rattling, deep pocketed GOP elites who not only wish to see their influence preserved, but who insist in all their pride that their righteous motives yielded righteous gains, and anyway, who are you to suggest otherwise, some kind of isolationist?  This is the takeaway from l’affaire Jeb Bush: the GOP foreign policy establishment is simply too proud to admit they committed a fatal error, politically, strategically, morally. “Most of the Republican presidential candidates would have invaded Iraq. Despite protestations to the contrary, few of them have truly learned the lessons of the war,” says James Antle at The Week. There is nothing in the founding and nothing in conservatism that says nation building abroad  or preemptive war is desirable, and yet “even today, the true conventional wisdom in the GOP seems to be that the only mistakes that were made in Iraq were invading with too few troops and withdrawing too soon.”

When the party which is supposed to stand for limited constitutional government that maximizes individual freedom eventually abandons its fixation with mimicking the domestic progressive project on the global stage and returns to its notional commitment to free markets and federalism, then that will be party worthy of my pride. Until then, all the elites in both parties should take a moment to consider why exactly growing government and expanding arbitrary power (whether with OSHA or the DHS) at the expense of ordinary taxpayers is anything to be proud of.

Or maybe the GOP is actually G.O.B.?

Iraq? Solid as a rock!

solid as a rock

 

Twilight of the Public Sector Union

Politico has an interesting piece today on the growing movement among Democrats to curtail public union clout. Like today’s WSJ editorial it focuses on Republican governor Bruce Rauner’s efforts to follow Scott Walker down the public pension reform path. What’s interesting is how many Democrats in state legislatures are waking up to the sustainability problem with the public union model.

In November Democrat Gina Raimondo won the Rhode Island governor’s race after a bruising primary where she defeated two union-backed candidates who were hell-bent on keeping the union reformer out of power. Raimondo is Rhode Island’s first female governor; just as importantly though, she is clear-eyed about the problem with public sector unions and unabashed about taking them on and demanding key reforms. Like every brave blue state Democrat trying to convince her left flank that reality is the obstacle standing athwart their collectivist dreams, Raimondo faces an uphill battle and is probably going to lose in the end. Such is life when facing off against the naked self-interests of a rabid and entrenched opposition.

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is nobody’s idea of a conservative, but he is fully aligned with Rauner in opposing the nasty Chicago Teachers Union, which needs corrupt legislators to rubber-stamp their collective bargaining scheme in the same way that humans need oxygen. Emanuel and Rauner are old colleagues, so the union left will say this is just more cronyism to fatten their own coffers by attacking unions. But any honest appraisal of Illinois politics will show that public unions exist first and last to expand the state bureaucracy, demanding always more money for pensions and benefits and higher taxes to pay for them. As a result, Illinois has the worst pension crisis of all the states and is considered a wasteland for business and economic growth. Neighboring Indiana and Iowa have so thoroughly outperformed Illinois this century that some Democrats in Springfield acknowledge the need for reform.

San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed offered an admirable sentiment after “clash[ing] with public employee unions” in California when he said that “there’s a difference between being liberal and progressive and being a union Democrat.” Is there really, though?

The hard truth that confronts the left is that they are not a viable political coalition without the millions of dues-paying public union members contributing millions to keep Democrats in office. At the federal, state and local levels, union leadership as well as the rank and file line up behind Democrats at astonishing rates. Take a gander at candidate contributions by federal bureaucrats (especially the lawyers) in the last presidential election. And what happens if the miracle occurs and Democrats abandon their corrupt union practices and admit that they are more responsible than anyone for the epidemic of blue state pension and budget fiascoes?  Do they go full retard and devote their entire political project to identity politics and the cultural fetishes of cloistered academics? I mean, I welcome it should it transpire, given that a politics that doubles and triples down on postmodern relativism and political correctness is a political movement not long for this world.

The only practical solution for the 21st century left is a complete re-think and overhaul of their approach to the economy. I am not confident or optimistic this will happen, committed as the left is to a religious conviction that they are constantly beset by a rigged system and the culprit is capitalism. Going back to the San Jose Mayor’s comment, I’m genuinely curious to learn what a liberal or progressive not in thrall to the romantic ideal of the trade union looks like. The left’s overriding ethos is that power and wealth are unfairly concentrated at the top, where “owners” exploit “workers” with their unearned capital accumulation. Marx was adamant that capital could only be accumulated through theft, and that impulse is alive and well with today’s left. The romance of the unions is all about leveling the field, sticking it to the fat cats via labor “solidarity,” strikes and bargaining power. It’s a zero sum philosophy with a cynical message: the wealth has been unfairly allocated to the rich few, thus the only recourse is to organize and plot to take back your rightful share. This line of thinking, beyond being juvenile and simple, betrays a fundamental lack of understanding of how market economies work. It obsesses over equitable distribution and is uncomfortable with the fact that life’s natural order is not fair. And it treats as obscene high profits and earnings, imagining that prosperity is best when it is shared; the point of politics then is to guard against unfairness wherever possible. That they fail to see how a system of perceived unfairness does in reality serve to foster the most broadly shared prosperity (see: America, The Unites States of) imaginable is a frustration we will likely have to endure forever.

Unless of course the left is forced into reconsidering its economic perspective by blue state voters sick of living in stagnant economies where insane percentages of state budgets are allocated just to public employees and their lavish benefits. 25% of Illinois’ budget is swallowed up union costs. TWENTY FIVE PERCENT! And yet the Chicago progressive mob is adamant that taxes must increase along with spending, a tune that never changes regardless of the fiscal climate. This is the kind of blind, tone-deaf, oblivious political thuggery that is going to doom the left eventually. The question is do they see the writing on the wall and are willing to make adjustments to their chief economic plank, or are they going down with the ship? By all accounts, union leadership is going to fight to the death to coax every last possible dime out of taxpayers before they shuffle off into the void, but there are more encouraging signs among rank and file members as well as savvy Democrats in the states. The problem is at the federal level, where public unions are less strapped by finite state budgets and reap the rewards of an out-of-control government spending apparatus. But even the big federal players like Afscme and AFT can see that reformer governors in blue states where unions typically enjoy broad approval are finding receptive audiences among state Democrats who realize the union model is unsustainable.

I contend that California will be a red state before Texas ever turns blue. Their pension crisis is not as horrible as Illinois’ but it ain’t pretty either. Chuck Reed and other California Dems (including Jerry Brown) may intuit the problem correctly, but it remains to be seen whether they have either the will or the ability to take on CALPERS and the rest of the bloated public sector. Far be it for me to offer advice to progressives on how to avoid squandering their entire movement, but if they want to be viable post-Obama they absolutely must ditch their wretched attachment to public sector unions and the cesspool of half-baked Marxism from which it draws inspiration. The only way that is ever going to happen is if they leave the politics of envy behind. Rising tides do indeed lift all boats, but if you’re consumed with rancor and envy and are convinced that America and capitalism are evil schemes constructed by greedy monocle-wearers, then it is going to be impossible to recalibrate your perspective on economics. Let’s let Schumpeter weigh in on the subject because no one has ever been able to explain this stuff quite like the Austrian master (emphasis mine):

In part [Capitalism] appeals to, and in part it creates, a schema of motives that is unsurpassed in simplicity and force. The promises of wealth and the threats of destitution that it holds out, it redeems with ruthless promptitude. Wherever the bourgeois way of life asserts itself sufficiently to dim the beacons of other social worlds, these promises are strong enough to attract the large majority of supernormal brains and to identify success with business success. They are not proffered at random; yet there is a sufficiently enticing admixture of chance: the game is not like roulette, it is more like poker. They are addressed to ability, energy and supernormal capacity for work; but if there were a way of measuring either that ability in general or the personal achievement that goes into any particular success, the premiums actually paid out would probably not be found proportional to either. Spectacular prizes much greater than would have been necessary to call forth the particular effort are thrown to a small minority of winners, thus propelling much more efficaciously than a more equal and more “just” distribution would, the activity of that large majority of businessmen who receive in return very modest compensation or nothing or less than nothing, and yet do their utmost because they have the big prizes before their eyes and overrate their chances of doing equally well. Similarly, the threats are addressed to incompetence. But though the incompetent men and the obsolete methods are in fact eliminated, sometimes very promptly, sometimes with a lag, failure also threatens or actually overtakes many an able man, thus whipping up everyone, again much more efficaciously than a more equal and more “just” system of penalties would. Finally, both business success and business failure are ideally precise. Neither can be talked away.”

-Joseph Schumpeter, Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy

Administrative State

For a hundred-plus years the progressive vision has sought to overturn the constitutional vision of separation of powers; of separate branches in conflict. Because the latter vision makes it purposely hard to enact laws, the former vision became frustrated and sought to find ways around the separation of powers. Hence the administrative state: a fourth branch of government that gained power through Congress willfully ceding their own. The oppressive administrative state under which we live today is answerable to no one, behaves as if it’s the aristocracy, and fights like hell to protect itself rather than serve the people it is tasked to serve. It is the nature of bureaucracy.

And progressives love it because a) it angers those of us who take constitutional democracy and separation of powers seriously and b) because it allows their preferences to be enacted on the country with minimal resistance. Congress won’t pass cap-and-trade? There’s an EPA for that. Congress won’t pass labor laws you like? There’s an NLRB for that. Won’t pass campaign finance restrictions? The IRS will take care of it. And on and on.

The thing they don’t realize because their ideological vision begins and ends with “must attain power,” is that as the administrative continues to grow and grow, often it’s going to establish entities that progressives hate. The DHS, the war on drugs, the militarization of police, Pentagon bloat…. this is all the result of Republicans using the administrative state to their liking (not to mine!) and to the chagrin of progressives.

People need to wake up and realize that, like the UK ceding most of its autonomy to Brussels via the EU, we are doing the same with the administrative bureaucracy, which is unelected, unaccountable, and makes most of the rules we have to live under quietly and in darkness.